Email Us Store
drop-down-btn

Show Menu

Rubio Monocoat Bourbon: Better than Pure?

When our customers call us for help choosing Rubio Monocoat colors, our default is almost always Pure. On most wood species, Pure is the easiest to apply, the easiest to maintain, and gives the warmest, most natural look. Pure is the new "black". But sometimes, Pure is not the right choice.  Especially on woods with yellow or green undertones, Pure can amplify undesirable colors and turn them opaque and murky. Pure also makes already dark woods like walnut even darker. Resorting to white or grey Rubio seem like the obvious answer, but they can can leave dark woods looking chalky. What could the solution be?

Answer: Bourbon!

You know how everything seems to go with your jeans? Well Bourbon is like the denim of the Rubio world. Bourbon has just enough of a warm light brown tone to neutralize yellowey pine and greenish hickory and also gives walnut and hickory depth and warmth, without making them too dark.  Check out the sample photos here, and stop into our store to see more examples of Rubio Monocoat!

Bourbon WO Rubio for web white oak no finish for webRaw white oak next to white oak with Rubio Monocoat Bourbon

 

 

 Raw hickory next to hickory with Rubio Monocoat Bourbon (yes, both boards in the right hand photo are hickory)hickory no finish for webBourbon on Hickory for web

It's our privilege to talk to people all over the U.S.... and sometimes even all over the world about their wood flooring adventures and problems. Here's a favorite recent website inquiry we received from across the ocean.

 

Our examination of popular myths about floor sanding continues! (Read part 1 of the series here.)

 

Handymans Book frontispieceI talk to people all day long about wood floors and sanding procedures.

Even the most open-minded DIY-er comes to me with many preconceived notions that are incorrect. And they hold on to these notions as though they were commandments.

But what I find astonishing is how many people have the same misconceptions. Is some version of Typhoid Mary out there, spreading and repeating misleading information about floors?