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7″ Edger Sandpaper Discs, 12-, 16-, 24-, 36-, 60-, 80-, 100-grit

Bolt-on style disc with 7/8” center hole.

$1.50$2.50

Quantity

Mineral: silicon carbide

Available in 12-, 16-, 24-, 36 and 60-grit. Bolt-on style disc with 7/8” center hole.

Mineral: Silicon Carbide

If you want more information about the different grits and how they work in sequence to sand wood floors to bare, we love educating customers about that.

12-grit
12-grit is the coarsest grit we carry, but it is only available for the edger. Why? Because It takes so much glue to hold the massive adhesive particles to the backing that it becomes brittle, so it can’t be made into a curved belt without cracking the glue sheet and breaking off all the grit pieces.

But in flat, disc form, the grit pieces stay in place, so they can remove large quantities of unwanted, old gunk from floor surfaces, especially smaller areas like stairs and closets. We send a lot of 12-grit out on jobs with old, painted porches.

12-grit as a prescription-only, pre-sanding, bad-axe. Its job to help you remove adhesives, glue, or multiple paint layers from floors. Think of it more as a virtual scraper or stripper for floors. But don’t be confused – this is not a one-step magic potion for those bad floors: it is the FIRST step. 12-grit should never be used to sand wood to bare.

Use it to remove up to 2/3 of your gunky business – it will prevent your later, finer grits from gunking up so quickly that you would have to replace them every foot. INSIDER TIP: if you are edging with any grit that is completely glazing over every 1-3 feet, you are using too fine a grit.

Allow one disc for every 10-20 linear feet of wall to be edged (assuming you are edging 10” out from the wall) or one for every three stair treads or one per closet.


16-grit

16-grit edger discs are the matching pair to the 16-grit drum belts. If you had to sand the middles of your floor with 16-grit on the drum, you will most definitely need 16-grit to sand the edges.

This is an extremely coarse mineral; it is designed to hold a large volume of paint, shellac, or lacquer so it can be removed from your floor.

It is NOT designed to sand wood to bare. It is a pre-sanding step only. I

f you use 16-grit until you make bare wood, the next grits in the sequence will struggle to remove the horrific scratch damage that the 16-grit mineral left in your floor. Use 16-grit to remove only about 2/3 of your finish. The 24-grit and 36-grits will do their share of removing the rest, but more gently, without removing any more wood fiber than necessary.

Allow 1 disc for every 20 linear feet


24-grit
24-grit discs are the matching item to 24-grit belts on the drum sander. If you had to sand the middles of your floor with 24-grit on the drum, you will most definitely need 24-grit to sand the edges.

This is a coarse mineral; it is designed to hold shellac, lacquer, or polyurethane so it can be removed from your floor but is NOT designed to sand wood to bare.

24-grit should leave just enough finish on your floor that the next grit, 36, can make the wood completely clean of finish. 24-grit is an important link in the chain of the grit sequence; it cannot be used just by itself.


36-grit
36-grit discs are the matching item to 36-grit belts on the drum sander. If you had to sand the middles of your floor with 36-grit on the drum, you will most definitely need 36-grit to sand the edges. In the universe of floor sanding grits,

36 counts as a medium grit. Its job is to make the wood bare. If you are struggling to use 36 to make your floor bare – it is taking multiple strokes, or the abrasive particles are quickly glazing over with finish – 36 is too fine for your conditions. But if the 36-grit sails over you wood, easily leaving bare wood behind, you are on the right grit, my friend.

36-grit is never your final grit.

It is an important link in the chain of the grit sequence; it cannot be used just by itself. 36-grit still leaves a pretty mean scratch in the wood. That scratch will take two more steps (60-grit, followed by 80) before it has any hope of being removed.

Allow one disc for every 25 linear feet of wall to be edged (assuming you are edging 10” out from the wall) or one for every three stair treads or one per closet.


60-grit
60-grit discs are the matching item to 60-grit belts on the drum sander. If you had to sand the middles of your floor with 60-grit on the drum, you will most definitely need 60-grit to sand the edges. In the universe of floor sanding grits, 60-grit counts as the first fine grit.

It has a very simple job: it reduces the scratches from the 36-grit mineral and leaves a scratch that can easily be removed by 80-grit, the last grit in the typical floor sanding sequence. If you skip 60, the 80-grit paper will not be able to make the 36-grit scratch disappear. We’ve tried it, but it just leads to tears.

But 60-grit should never be your final grit either because it leaves a scratch in wood that is still quite visible to the naked eye.

60-grit is a crucial link in the sequence of your sanding grits, but rarely gets to be the star


80-grit

If you had to sand the middles of your floor with 80-grit on the drum, you will most definitely need 80-grit to sand the edges. In the universe of floor sanding grits, 80-grit is usually the finest and last grit used on the floor (except for the edges of maple and fir floors.

The job of the 80-grit paper is to sand out the scratches from the previous grit, 60, so that the wood is effectively scratch-free. This will not leave the wood silky-smooth, nor should it. 80-grit should leave enough texture in the wood so that the finish can bond effectively, but without leaving deeply visible scratch marks.


100-grit

100-grit edger discs are the item to use if you have a fir or maple floor and you have sanded the middles of the floor with 80-grit on the drum sander.

We rarely bother sanding to 100grit on the drum sander – drum sanders leave such a nice, parallel scratch that usually the 80-grit is well-camouflaged in the wood grain and almost indiscernible. But the edger leaves scratches that go against the grain, which are difficult to hide, and on maple and fir they tend to be even more visible. So, our insider tip is to skip 80 on the edger for those woods and jump straight to 100-grit.

The 100-grit is just strong enough to remove the scratch from the previous grit (60), but leaves a finer, shallower, less noticeable scratch.